Russia discovers how to jam US drones in Syria

The Russian military has been jamming some U.S. military drones operating in the skies over Syria, seriously affecting military operations

Russia discovers how to jam US drones in Syria

An RQ-7B Shadow prepares to land during training near Camp McGregor, N.M., April 5, 2018. The drone belongs to the Company D, 150th Engineer Battalion, who are preparing for a deployment to the Middle East. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brittany Johnson.)

By Courtney Kube
NBC News

WASHINGTON — The Russian military has been jamming some U.S. military drones operating in the skies over Syria, seriously affecting American military operations, according to four U.S. officials.

The Russians began jamming some smaller U.S. drones several weeks ago, the officials said, after a series of suspected chemical weapons attacks on civilians in rebel-held eastern Ghouta. The Russian military was concerned the U.S. military would retaliate for the attacks and began jamming the GPS systems of drones operating in the area, the officials explained.

Jamming, which means blocking or scrambling a drone's reception of a signal from a GPS satellite, can be uncomplicated, according to Dr. Todd Humphreys, the director of the Radionavigation Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin.

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