5 reasons why infantrymen are perfect for the SWAT team

For many, the only real change between the infantry and SWAT is the uniform

By Eric Milzarski
We Are The Mighty

Many troops enlist with hopes of finding something bigger than themselves. After their contract is up, it's not uncommon for the battle-hardened grunt to feel lost in a world now unfamiliar. All the while, they're told that there's nothing out there for them but flipping burgers or greeting customers at some supermarket.

Then, there's the world of law enforcement. The police force is, and always will be, trying to scoop up as many of these former-military badasses as possible. In terms of transitions, going from the armed forces into law enforcement isn't that much of a stretch: you'll face similar hours, do similar tasks, and be surrounded by similar camaraderie all in attempts to promote greater good.

With the utmost respect to law enforcement officers, however, many infantrymen aren't interested in waiting at the local doughnut shop until it's time to write parking tickets and toss the same village drunk into the lockup — again. They want something bigger, something badass, something that rewards their ability to kick in doors. This is where the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team comes in.

For many, the only real change between the infantry and SWAT is the uniform. Here's why:

1. The job description is nearly identical

Heavy ballistic armor? Check. Assigned weapon? Check. Breaking down doors to catch bad guys? Oh, yeah — check.

The SWAT team's objective is to keep the peace at a level higher than is expected of the average cop. While every police officer should be trained and ready to fight at a moment's notice should the situation arise, the SWAT team provides that extra oomph needed in intense situations, like bank robberies, hostage negotiations, and high-level drug cartel activities.

Instead of infiltrating a compound in Kandahar to catch an HVT bomb maker, SWAT officers are infiltrate compounds back home to catch drug kingpins.


You'll even do the exact same training. Being an infantryman just gets you ready for the same ol' ride. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Patrick Harrower)

2. The requirements are basically the same

Potential applicants must be physically fit, hard working, excellent shots, mentally and emotionally strong, decisive under stress, and able to communicate under hazardous conditions.

The help-wanted ad reads almost exactly like a description of a post-deployment infantryman.

The only thing holding an infantryman back from immediately joining the SWAT team is that, typically, membership requires three years of prior experience in law enforcement. I can't speak for every police department, but that requirement can be lessened for exceptionally badass applicants.


Did I mention that you'll spend a lot of time training at the range? (Photo by Staff Sgt. Patrick Harrower)

3. The structure almost mirrors the military

Between SWAT teams and military life, the chain of command is identical and the organizational structure is the same.

Being selected for SWAT isn't easy. Potential recruits go through a grueling process and only the best of the best can make it through to the end. But if you do, you're basically in the military again.

You've still got a battle buddy (you'll call them "partner" instead), you still work in four-man teams (squads) and there'll be, on average, 15 teams per district. Since high-stakes situations aren't happening every day, you're going to be training and continually honing your skills with your team.


You really will be training ... a lot. Which shouldn't be too far off from infantry life. (Photo by Sgt. Juana M. Nesbitt)

4. The brotherhood is just as tight

If there's one thing that damn-near every veteran misses about the military, it's the camaraderie. Knowing that the people to your left and right would die for you without a second thought is hard to come by at some desk job.

SWAT is not a place to go if you're looking to make a name for yourself at the expense of others. Real SWAT teams live as a unit, work as a team, and train until everyone becomes as close as family.

This level of trust in another human can only be formed in groups like the military and SWAT.


Officers got each other's back, literally and figuratively. (Photo by Sgt. John Crosby)

5. The good you do is in your community

As a SWAT officer, you're not deploying for 12 months at a time and leaving your family behind. You're still going to come home and sleep in your own bed most nights.

Now, don't get that twisted: There will be bad nights. There will be moments that go horribly wrong. There will be missions that require you to be gone for extended periods of time. SWAT officers, like infantrymen, are over-worked and under-appreciated.

But doing the difficult thing to promote the greater good is exactly what you're signing up for — again.


Military service is very common among law enforcement officers — especially in SWAT. You'll fit right in. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Patrick Harrower)